UX/UI Unconference Handouts

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Thanks to our UX experts and attendees – both in-person and virtual via our go-to meeting software – yesterday for the great turnout and lively discussions!   Here is a link to our event evaluation if you didn’t get a chance to fill it out:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1tyy9CiRbOUHUlrVz162Av3vNRixr1huIf0je1HLZUk0/viewform

There were some handouts shared at the event with useful tips and suggestions on how to do usability testing.

Remote & Moderated Usability Testing Method
Interviewing Users

And some folks have asked for the brownie recipe Annie used:  http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017852-violet-bakery-rye-brownies

Anderson & English: Usability of Books in Browsers

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Steven Anderson and Eben English of the Boston Public Library were facing a good problem. Thousands of new book objects being ingested into their collection, and they needed a browser-based, platform-agnostic interface to allow users to read content online. So, they found four open source tools and started testing.

Check out the slides for details of the study’s design, scope, and methodology, and for hugely useful practical advice — lessons learned — for organizations dipping a toe into the UX pool. My favorite? “Humans are unpredictable.”

Whether you’re testing ebook readers or something else, you’ll find insightful ideas in these slides. Go for it! http://goo.gl/mLCwwa

Chris LaRoche: UX Fundamentals

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Chris LaRoche of MIT and UXPA Boston took on the important role of introducing #neasistUX attendees to the basics of user experience fundamentals. This info was so valuable that I immediately resolved to attend more UXPA Boston events — meetups, Saturday workshops, and their annual conference in May.

Check out Chris’s slides! This deck is one-stop shopping for getting started with User Experience. You’ll get industry jargon explained, a big-picture view of how the UX field developed and where it’s going now, and important insights into online pokies user experience in terms of research, design, and evaluation. You’ll also see great resources for deepening your UX knowledge, including the Usability Book of Knowledge and a book on my to-read list, Dan Norman’s The Design of Everyday Things.

If you’re trying to remember the details from the UXPA salary survey (hint: lucrative!), view these slides.

If you’re planning how to sell your administration and stakeholders on investing more in user experience design and testing, view these slides.

If you’re kicking yourself for missing #neasistUX, definitely view these slides!

simmons_intro_to_ux_Jan16 (ppt; 1MB)

User Experience Design & Research — Conference Roundup

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Let’s give a GIANT thank you to everyone who helped us start off January with a productive and inspiring conference on user experience design. The New England library community is wasting no time in 2016!

You can look forward to a series of posts providing slides and further discussion of how we can put the best practices of UX design and testing into action at our institutions. Click on the names for more information from these great information professionals who shared their expertise at NEASIST’s 2016 January conference, User Experience Design & Research: UX and You.

PRESENTATIONS

DEMONSTRATIONS

CASE STUDIES

Finally, we extend our gratitude and sympathy to two usability experts who couldn’t participate in person, but who nevertheless contributed greatly to the success of this conference.

  • Mare Parker-O’Toole, Wheelock
  • Rong Tang, Simmons